Dr.Madeleine Albright & Dr. Lloyd Axworthy speaks on R2P at the University of Toronto

 

On April 1st, 2014, at the Seeley Hall of Trinity College, University of Toronto, the Canadian Centre for the Responsibility to Protect and the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History co-hosted a student panel discussion featuring Dr.Madeleine Albright, the 64th secretary of state of the United States, and Dr.Lloyd Axworthy, former Minister of Foreign Affairs of Canada, chaired by Hon. Bill Graham, Chancellor of Trinity College. Four students from the University of Toronto served on the panel: Ms.Hope Caldi, Mr.Misha Boutilier, Ms.Rachel Gunn and Mr.Patrick Quinton-Brown. Dr.Albright and Dr.Axworthy reflected upon the lessons learned from the Rwandan Genocide, failures of humanitarian interventions in the 1990s, and the future of global humanitarianism. This event attracted over 150 students and faculty at the University of Toronto and served as an integral part of the Rwanda20 campaign co-hosted by the CCR2P and the Bill Graham Centre to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the Rwandan Genocide.

Click here for the coverage by the University of Toronto’s Media Relations Department.

 

Dr.Madeleine Albright and Ms.Tina Jiwon Park at Trinity College, University of Toronto, April 1, 2014

Dr.Madeleine Albright and Ms.Tina Jiwon Park at Trinity College, University of Toronto,                     April 1, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Student audience from the University of Toronto (April 1, 2014) Photo by Nicolett Jakab

Photo credit to Nicolett Jakab

Tina’s Welcome Remarks at the Seeley Hall                                          (Photo credit to Nicolett Jakab)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tina thanking Dr.Lloyd Axworthy after the event (Photo credit to Nicolett Jakab)

(From left to right) Mr.Geoff Seaborn, Ms. Tina Park, Dr. Lloyd Axworthy and Dr. John English

(From left to right) Mr.Geoff Seaborn, Ms. Tina Park, Dr. Lloyd Axworthy and Dr. John English (Photo by Nicolett Jakab)

 

 

 

 

Chancellor of Trinity College, Hon. Bill Graham, chairing a panel discussion with Dr.Madeleine Albright & Dr.Lloyd Axworthy (Seeley Hall, Trinity College) Photo credits to Nicolett Jakab

Chancellor of Trinity College, Hon. Bill Graham, chairing a panel discussion with Dr.Madeleine Albright & Dr.Lloyd Axworthy (Seeley Hall, Trinity College) Photo credits to Nicolett Jakab

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Student panellists with Dr.Lloyd Axworthy and Dr.Madeleine Albright

Student panellists with Dr.Lloyd Axworthy and Dr.Madeleine Albright (Photo by Nicolett Jakab)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below, please find a full text of  Tina’s welcome address.

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April 1st 2014

OPENING REMARKS

Good afternoon,

Dr. Madeleine Albright, Dr. Lloyd Axworthy, Chancellor Bill Graham and our distinguished guests:

On behalf of the Canadian Centre for the Responsibility to Protect and the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History, I am delighted to welcome you today for our student panel discussion here at Trinity College.

My name is Tina Park and I am a co-founder and executive director of the Canadian Centre for R2P.

Based at the Munk school of Global Affairs, the Canadian Centre for R2P is mandated with promoting scholarly engagement and political implementation of the Responsibility to Protect principle. As a leading non-profit and non-partisan research organization for R2P in Canada, we currently have over 80 students working in our research and advocacy wings. We have also recently advised the Inter-Parliamentary Union on their resolution on the role of parliamentarians in enforcing R2P.

With the International Relations Programme at Trinity College and the Bill Graham Centre, we have recently launched a campaign this spring to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the Rwandan Genocide and reflect upon the past, present and future of the R2P principle. Through our campaign, we hope to reflect upon our pledge of “never again” in our efforts to curb mass human atrocities and discuss how we can make the responsibility to protect a living reality in the 21st century.

In addition to the full-day conference last Saturday, our campaign consists of a film festival, a youth and education outreach program to high schools in Toronto, and a publication project with the Canadian International Council’s OpenCanada, featuring reflections by twenty prominent Canadians on the lessons learned from the Rwandan Genocide.

Today’s panel discussion is an important part of our campaign as we engage in dialogues with two very distinguished guests, Dr.Albright and Dr.Axworthy, who have made enormous contributions in the promotion of global humanitarianism. We are honoured that they could share their insightful ideas with the students at the University of Toronto and are extremely grateful of their time and dedication.

Now, I am delighted to introduce our Chancellor, Honourable Bill Graham, to you, who will be chairing today’s panel discussion.

A graduate of Trinity College, Chancellor Graham was first elected as a Liberal MP for Toronto Centre-Rosedale in 1993 and served the Toronto Centre until 2007. He also served as a chairman of the standing committee of the House of Commons on Foreign Affairs and International Trade. He served as the Minister of Foreign Affairs from 2002 to 2004 and subsequently as the Minister of National Defense from 2004 to 2006. In February 2006, he was appointed as the Leader of the Official Opposition.

Prior to entering politics, Chancellor Graham had a very distinguished legal career. After earning his law degree at the University of Toronto as the Gold Medallist, he pursued a doctorate in law in Paris. As a partner in Fasken & Calvin in Toronto, he practiced litigation and international commercial law, primarily in Europe, Africa and the Middle East. In the 1980s, he taught international law at the Faculty of Law here at the University of Toronto.

As the Chancellor of Trinity College, Professor Graham has been an exceptional mentor to many of our students and a generous supporter of our international relations program, the Canadian Centre for R2P as well as the newly launched Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History.

Without further delay, please join me in welcoming Chancellor Graham to the podium.

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2015 UN General Assembly on R2P

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Tina Park on behalf of CCR2P at the UN General Assembly, Sept 2015

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Tina Park on behalf of CCR2P at the UN General Assembly

 

Tina Park delivered a statement on behalf of the Canadian Centre for the Responsibility to Protect at the UN General Assembly’s interactive dialogue on the R2P at the UN Headquarters in New  York in September 2015.  Below is the text of her address in English. Please click here for the statement in other languages. Please click here for the U of T media’s coverage.

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Mr. Moderator,

Thank you for the privilege of speaking to the General Assembly.

The Canadian Centre for the Responsibility to Protect fully endorses this year’s report on implementing R2P and commends Special Adviser Dr. Jennifer Welsh for her tireless efforts. The Secretary-General’s commitment and leadership on R2P is deeply appreciated.

Mr. Moderator, the photo of Aylan Kurdi, a three-year old Syrian boy whose body appeared on the shores of Turkey last week, has underlined the seminal humanitarian challenge of our time. Our global paralysis on Syria has contributed to the death of thousands and displacement of millions. The speed, magnitude and brutality of the Syrian crisis calls for our compassion and our collective responsibility.

This year marks not only the 10th anniversary of the 2005 World Summit but also the centennial of the Armenian Genocide, the twentieth anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre, and the seventieth anniversary of the signing of the UN Charter. As we recall our pledge of “never again,” we must confront on-going challenges in the Central African Republic, South Sudan, Yemen, Iraq, and North Korea.

The Canadian Centre respectfully offers six points for the future:

First, domestic embracing of R2P by all member states is critical. Appointing the National R2P Focal Point is an important first step, but it must be accompanied by an action plan with specific policy options and long-term strategies tailored to national circumstances.

Second, a stronger partnership must be built between parliamentarians, academics, journalists, businesses, security sectors, and civil society groups across the globe, to widen and deepen public support for R2P. The Inter-Parliamentary Union Assembly’s resolution in 2013 has pledged parliamentarians to mobilize their resources for enforcing R2P at home.

Third, to make prevention a priority for R2P, more resources must be dedicated towards education, training, and investment in infrastructure. We must be proactive in using technology and social media to track and assess risks, refute hateful messages, and empower the younger generations. Addressing the root causes of mass atrocities and building national resilience will be a slow process, requiring institutional changes.

Fourth, to end the culture of impunity, member states that have yet to join the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court and the Additional Protocols to the Geneva Conventions must ratify them in a timely manner. A firm mechanism to hold perpetrators accountable will be an important deterrent against future crimes.

Fifth, mainstreaming R2P across the UN system in line with the “Human Rights Up Front” initiative will require a careful re-assessment of the UN’s protection capacity, as well as enhancing clarity and efficiency in its coordination mechanisms. Restraining the Security Council’s use of the veto power for R2P cases is an important part of this process.

Lastly, the real success of Pillar Three for R2P will depend on building deployable capacity in political, financial, technical, humanitarian and ultimately, military terms. Timely and decisive responses will require a credible pool of resources and a comprehensive strategy of engagement, especially in the face of violent extremism.

Mr. President, in our struggle against hate, indifference and mass atrocities, R2P offers a powerful paradigm to unite our efforts.

At the Canadian Centre for the R2P, we believe that each of us must step up and choose hope over cynicism to make R2P a living reality.  Thank you.

Tina J. Park

Co-Founder & Executive Director

Canadian Centre for the Responsibility to Protect  

(www.ccr2p.org )

 

128th IPU Assembly Adopts R2P Resolution

"Enforcing Responsibility to Protect"

The Inter-Parliamentary Union has officially adopted a resolution calling for acceptance of the R2P principle at the national parliamentary level and beyond. At the 128th Aseembly in Quito, which brought together nearly 630 MPs from 121 countries, delegates adopted a resolution titled “Enforcing the Responsibility to Protect: The Role of Parliament In Safeguarding Civilians’ Lives.” You can find the full resolution here. The full text of the IPU press release on the affair can be found below. The original press release can be found here.